#TBT Crash Victims Better

!Header 10.20.1941

Yankton Press & Dakotan
October 20, 1941 (evening); p. 2, col. 2

CRASH VICTIMS BETTER

LITTLE FALLS, Minn., Oct. 20 (AP) — Lt. Gov. C. Elmer Anderson and his wife, injured in an automobile accident near here Saturday, were still in St. Gabriel’s hospital here today, but attendants said both were “resting well” and probably will recover.

 

[Note: Lt. Governor Anderson would, in fact, recover and went on to serve as Lt. Governor until 1943, and then again from 1945 until 1951, eventually becoming Governor from 1951 to 1955.  He passed away in 1998 at the age of 85.  His obituary can be found here.]

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

#TBT Competitive Cornhusking

!Header 10.20.1941

Apparently, cornhusking was big news in South Dakota in October 1941.  I almost wonder if West Side Story had been set in South Dakota, would the “rumble” involve competitive cornhusking?  “When you’re a Jet, you’re a Jet all the way, from your first ear of corn to your last dying day …”  Just doesn’t have the same ring.

This issue has TWO articles related to cornhusking.  I’ve identified them individually below:

Yankton Press & Dakotan
Monday, October 20, 1941 (evening); p. 5, col. 4

corn-husking-contest-may-be-battle-of-mayors-p5-col-4HUSKING CONTEST MAY BE BATTLE OF MAYORS

ELKTON, Oct. 20 (AP) — It begins to look like the state cornhusking contest at Rosholt Wednesday is going to be a battle of mayors.

After the mayor of Wahpeton, N. D., challenged any South Dakota mayor to a special husking exhibition during the state event, Dr. F. M. Philips, Dell Rapids, accepted the challenge and became South Dakota’s representative.

Now, Mayor M. A. McCoy of Elkton has signified his intentions of joining the affair.  He is manager of a public utility company here.


Yankton Press & Dakotan
Monday, October 20, 1941 (evening); p. 2, col. 2

cornhusking-contest-p2-col-2Wakonda Monitor:  Fifteen women entered in the cornhusking contest for women at Harford, S. D., last week demonstrated that they can do a first class job in the corn field as well as the kitchen.  The winner, Mrs. Floyd Kelly of Hartford, with a gross load of 479 lbs. in 30 minutes and a net load of 419 pounds or six bushels, was making a gross average of about 114 bushels for an eight hour day.  A crowd of 1600 people watched the contest.  A ladies’ aid in Hartford sponsored the contest.

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

Ancestor Spotlight: Mary Lucille Crowe Gallagher (1925-2013)

Some of my earliest memories of my grandmother, Mary Lucile Crowe, include food.  Specifically cinnamon toast, and macaroni and cheese on no-meat Fridays.  I also remember her beautiful quilts and spending summers in her swimming pool in Orlando.

In my quest to “Do-Over” my genealogy research, I’m putting together a timeline of my grandmother’s life.  I plan to use this as part to-do list and part reference (and, of course, cousin bait!).  Here’s what I’ve put together so far:

DateEventSource(s)
6 Nov 1925Mary Lucile Crowe is born at 1337 Tabor Street in Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana to Harold J. and Lucile CroweBirth certificate; census records
22 Apr 1930Family lives at 1637 Raymond in Indianapolis, Indiana1930 U.S. census
1933Family lives at 2435 S. State Street in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records
9 Jun 1939Mary Lou attended primary school at St. Catherine School in Indianapolis.Mary Lou's school records
Jan 1940Mary Lou attends junior high at Emmerich Manual Training High School in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records
21 Apr 1940Family lives at 2133 Madison Avenue in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records; 1940 U.S. census
Jan 1941-Jun 1943Mary Lou attends senior high school at Emmerich Manual Training High School in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records
Jan 1942Family lives at 839 Weghorst Street in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records; recorded memory of sibling
Jun 1942Family lives at 520 Bacon Street in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records
Jan 1943Family lives at 1249 Morgan Drive in IndianapolisMary Lou's school records
4 Jun 1943Mary Lou receives award for 4 years of perfect attendance in high schoolMary Lou's school records
20 Jan 1945Mary Lou is married to John Joseph Gallagher at St. Catherine Catholic Church in IndianapolisOriginal wedding missal completed by bride and priest; marriage certificate; marriage application
1945Mary Lou and John live at 651 Virgil Avenue in Ridgefield, Bergen, New Jersey*
19 Jun 1947Birth of first daughter in Teaneck, Bergen, New Jersey*
20 Feb 1949Birth of twin daughters in Teaneck, New JerseyBirth certificate
18 Apr 1950Birth of fourth daughter in Teaneck, New Jersey*
11 Jan 1954Birth of first son in Hackensack, Bergen, New JerseyCongratulatory telegram from family friends
1 Jan 1958Birth of second son in Hackensack, New Jersey*
15 Oct 1955Mary Lou appointed Historian of American Legion Auxiliary Roemer-Bollerman Post 221 in Ridgefield, Bergen, New JerseyMeeting program; newspaper article
29 Sep 1956Mary Lou appointed Treasurer of American Legion Auxiliary Roemer-Bollerman Post 221 in RidgefieldMeeting program
1962Family moves to Naples, Florida and buys a motel; can't really make a go of it*
1963Family moves to Miami; John works for Pinkerton*
Notice the huge gap in the timeline here
19 Feb 1990John Joseph Gallagher dies in Altamonte Springs, Seminole, FloridaDeath certificate
1969-1970Mary Lou and John move to Kennesaw, Georgia*
1999Mary Lou traveled to IrelandMary Lou's passport
2005Mary Lou marries Don Diehl in Florida*
20 Apr 2013Mary Lou dies in Tampa, Hillsborogh, FloridaDeath certificate

 

The * in the source indicates that I need to locate a source for the information (most of these events relate to people I haven’t gotten to yet in my Do-Over), and I have placed them on my master to-do list.

Obviously, I also need to fill in the giant gap before 1990.  I know this was a time when the family was living in Miami and my grandfather was working as a guard for Pinkerton, then for a life insurance company, and eventually for the Inspector General of the USDA investigating food stamp fraud.  Unfortunately, with the exception of the residence information, most of this doesn’t go in my grandmother’s timeline.  She didn’t work outside the home, but I know she volunteered at her church and I think she was a member of some civic and community organizations.  I’ll put that investigation on my master to-do list as well.

 

Genealogy Snapshot

Name: Mary Lucille Crowe
Parents: Harold J. Crowe, Sr. and Lucile Francis Stiker
Spouse: John Joseph Gallagher
Surnames: Crowe, StikerGallagher
Relationship to Jenny: Maternal Grandmother

  1. Mary Lucille Crowe
  2. Jenny’s mom
  3. Jenny

#TBT Classified Ads

!Header 10.20.1941

Yankton Press & Dakotan
October 20, 1941 (Evening); p 4, col 3

I don’t usually post the classifieds, but I realized that there are a lot of addresses, and even some names listed … names and addresses that someone might be searching.  So I thought it would be a good idea to make them searchable.  I won’t transcribe the ads verbatim, but I will list out all the addresses and include any corresponding names.  I assume all addresses are in Yankton, South Dakota, unless otherwise noted.

Classifieds p4 col 3 part 1

CLASSIFIED ADS

Addresses only:

100 Broadway
408 Cedar
417 Linn
521 Maple
410 Burleigh
509 Capitol
201 Locust
802 Cedar
704 Walnut
207 Broadway

Names only:

R. A. Wheeler
Ed Pillar, Scotland, S.D.
Charles Jensen, Irene
J. Frick
Harold Nelson, Centerville, So. Dak.
Peter J. Stark, Utica
A. Kolda, Utica
Morris DeJong, Springfield, S. D.
James M. Schuch, Tabor, So. Dak.
Mrs. William Gallagher
N. H. Nielsen, Mission Hill
Dr. E. M. Morehouse

Names and Addresses:

R. H. Allen, 1909 Locust; 110-1/2 W. Third
Jack Steinbach, Rt. 1, Yankton
Rev. J. Thiessen, Rt. 1, Yankton
Don Cadwell, 117-1/2 W. Third
Louis Schiferl, 2-north; 1-west, Mission Hill  (I’m actually not sure this is an address, but it might help someone)
L. J. Larson Electrical Service, 220 Capitol
J. F. Malloy, M.D., 101-1/2 W. Third
Dr. H. F. Eby, 122-1/2 W. Third St.

Classifieds p4 col 3 part 2

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

#TBT Cattle Moving in Big Numbers

!Header 10.20.1941

Yankton Press & Dakotan
October 20, 1941 (Evening); p 2, col 8

Am I the only one who read the title of this post “Cattle Moooving in Big Numbers?” … I wonder if the reporter had the same thought back in 1941.

Cattle Moving in Big Numbers p2 col 8CATTLE MOVING IN BIG NUMBERS

Belle Fourche Reports Boom Condition Prevailing On The Range

BELLE FOURCHE, Oct. 20. (AP) — In weather beaten chaps, a sheepskin coat and leather jacket, A. O. Pemberton came to town this week behind 750 Hereford steers his boys drove across the trail from Powder river to the end of the railroad here.

It was his forty-first trek to this cattle capital, once the largest stock shipping point in the United States.  But Pemberton was the only one to trail this year.  Most of the stock comes by truck to the railroad.

“The rest of the boys are getting a little tony,” he said.  I guess they can’t get out and rough it any more.”

Going To Feed-Lots

The cattle were shipped from New Mexico last fall, trailed from Arvada, Wyo., to the Pilgrim creek ranch for fattening on lush western short grass and back here for shipment to a feed lot in the east.

Much of the beef stock is going to feedlots this year.  Pemberton had planned to ship to Omaha until a feeder reached him before the herd even reached town.

Stockmen and railroad officials look for the biggest shipping here since before brought days.  Already 400 loads of livestock have cleared on the Chicago and North Western railroad, composed of about 18,000 head of sheep and 6,100 cattle.

Big Shipments

Shippers estimate the total this year will be about 1,300 cars, compared with 983 last year and 1,100 in 1939.  The biggest year was in 1902 when 110,000 head of stock, principally cattle, left Belle Fourche with a value of about $6,000,000.  In two months of September, 1890, when the first shipment was made, 1,300 cars of cattle cleared the yards here, and in 1895, some 3,000 cars left.

Sheep have taken over the ranges in many places around here, and cattle shipments have been dropping.  In Butte county alone, census estimators and livestock men calculate there are 167,000 head.

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.