#TBT More Candidates File Expense Items

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Yankton Press & Dakotan
4 June 1938 (Evening); p. 1, col. 5

More Candidates File ExpensesMORE CANDIDATES FILE EXPENSE ITEMS

PIERRE, June 4 (AP) — Mark W. Sheafe of Watertown and W. L. Chaussee of Vermillion, two of the unsuccessful candidates for the democratic congressional nomination in the first district, filed their campaign expense accounts with Secretary of State Goldie Wells today.

Sheafe reported he spent $600.89, mostly for traveling and advertising.  He reported contributions totaling $55.  Chaussee spent $156.20 and listed no donations.

The Loriks for congress farm committee filed a report showing receipts of $51.25 and expenditures of a like amount in the interest of Emil Loriks of Arlington, who was nominated by the democrats as their candidate in the first congressional district.

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Amanuensis Monday: Crowe-Stiker Marriage

 

This is a blog prompt borrowed from Randy Seaver at Genea-Musings, who credits Geneablogger John Newmark (TransylvanianDutch blog) with starting this blog theme years ago.  John offers this definition for ‘amanuensis:’

“A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another.”

(And, let’s be honest, this is probably the only way I’m going to remember to transcribe all my documents, right?)

This is the marriage record for my great grandparents Harold John Crowe and Lucile Frances Stiker.

Harold Crowe & Lucile Stiker Marriage licenseSTATE OF INDIANA, Posey County, ss:

BE IT REMEMBERED: That on the 15th day of September A.D. 1920
a Marriage License was issued to Harold J. Crowe and
Lucile F. Stiker
in the words and figures following, to wit:

INDIANA, TO WIT:  POSEY COUNTY:

To All Who Shall See These Presents, Greeting:

KNOW YE, That any person legally authorized to solemnize Matrimony is hereby licensed to join in
Marriage the HUSBAND AND WIFE Harold J. Crowe and
Lucile F. Stiker and for so doing this shall be his sufficient authority.

IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, I, KELLY DE FUR, Clerk of the Posey Circuit
Court, hereunto subscribe my name and affix the seal of said court
this 15th day of September 1920.

Kelly DeFur, Clerk
By Dale DeFur, Deputy Clerk

AND AFTERWARDS, to wit:  On the 20th day of September A.D. 1920
the following Certificate of Marriage of said parties was returned and filed, to wit:

INDIANA, TO WIT:  POSEY COUNTY

THIS CERTIFIES, That I joined in Marriage as HUSBAND AND WIFE
Harold J. Crowe and Lucille Stiker
on the 16th day of September 1920

Joseph T. Bauer

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Surname Saturday: Bourke

Bourke

Surname Origins

According to the Internet Surname Database, the Bourke has English and Irish roots, mostly of noble families (so I’m pretty sure my branch is one of the other ones).  The website indicates that it is one of the first surnames ever recorded, dating back to Geoffrey de Burk in 1272

Surname in my Tree

My closest Bourke ancestor is my 2nd great grandmother, Elizabeth/Eliza/Elise Bourke (1861-1930).  Her father is Louis Bourk (1830-1897), and his father is believed to be Francis Bourk (~1798-bef. 1880).

Migration

According to census records, Francis Bourk was born in Canada around 1798.  He first appears on a U.S. census record with his son Louis in 1870.  Louis had already been in the United States for quite some time by that point, having married Merencienne Bellgard (~1835-1873) on February 2, 1853 in Will County, Illinois (HUGE thank you to my friend Laura Lorenzana for obtaining a copy of that marriage certificate for me!).  The couple remained in Illinois, producing 4 known children by 1864,  including my 2nd great grandmother Eliza, before migrating to Michigan sometime before 1867, where they produced two more children.  Around 1870, they migrated one more time to Nebraska, which is likely where Eliza met my 2nd great grandfather, Joseph Zenophile Lanctot.  Eliza and Zenophile were married April 17, 1881 in Fremont, Dodge, Nebraska, and by 1882 had one child.  They migrated to Dakota Territory (eventually South Dakota) around 1885 and resided there for the remainder of their lives.  They returned to Mead, Saunders, Nebraska for a short time in 1887, which is where my great grandfather Louis Lanctot was born.  He is the only child not born in South Dakota.

Future Research

I really feel like I need to solidify the vitals for Eliza before I can really focus on her father and grandfather.  She and her birth story are the sticky wicket in this branch of my tree.  I feel like perhaps once I get past that hurdle, I can start piecing some other information together so this family makes some sense.  I’m working on putting together a new research plan and to-do list for her.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

#TBT Hearing at Platte on Missouri Game Refuge

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Yankton Press & Dakotan
4 Jun 1938 (Evening); p. 2, col. 4

Hearing at Platte MO Game RefugeHEARING AT PLATTE ON MISSOURI GAME REFUGE

PLATTE (Special) — A special hearing held here by Mr. O. H. Johnson, state director of Game and Fish, was largely attended by sportsmen from Mitchell, Lake Andes, Scotland, Corsica, Armour and Platte, and by several game wardens and deputies, including D. Allgier of Lake Andes.

The hearing was for the purpose of ascertaining sentiment concerning the closing of the Missouri river in South Dakota from the Rosebud Bridge south of Platte to the Nebraska state line, a distance of 12 1/4 miles, to further shooting of migratory waterfowl in season.  The river has been closed from this bridge northward across the state to the North Dakota state line for a number of years, and the state fish and game department now proposes to close it the rest of the way.  Considerable opposition was shown to the proposition, but the majority seemed to favor it.

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Happy 4th Blogiversary to me!

empty plate

Originally, there was a celebratory cake on this plate.  Oops.  It was delicious.

Four years ago today, I wrote and published my first blog post.  Since then, I have written and published 428 more.  Some have been informative, some have been silly, and some might have even gotten me into a bit of trouble.  And still people read them.  And for that, I thank you, my loyal (or at least tolerant) readers.  I wouldn’t still be here without you.

In the last four years, I have made some great friends in the genealogy and blogging communities – both virtually and in real life – and I have learned something from each and every one of you that has helped shape me into the writer I am today.  So I guess what I’m saying is … you’re to blame.

Seriously though, in writing this blog I have been able to merge two of my great passions – genealogy and writing – and I’m glad to have you all along for the ride.

Here’s to at least 4 more years!

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved