#TBT Faces Prospect at 22 of Life Imprisonment

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Yankton Press & Dakotan

4 Jun 1938 (Evening), p. 1, col. 5

FACES PROSPECT AT 22 OF LIFE IMPRISONMENT

Faces Prospect of Life ImprisonmentMINNEAPOLIS, June 4 AP — Kenneth W. Palmer, at 22, today faced the prospect of spending the rest of his life in prison for the murder of Mrs. Goldie Rosen.

Yesterday he heard his wife shriek “It isn’t true! It isn’t true!” a
s a district court jury returned a verdict that he was guilty of beating the Minneapolis woman to death in her apartment the night of Jan. 18.

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SHOOTING IN THEATRE

SHANGHAI June 4, (AP) — A Lyceum theater audience attending a charity performance for war refugees was thrown into panic tonight when a gunman arose as the final curtain fell and shot a Chinese official of the International Business Machines Corporation.

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NO POISON FOUND

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. June 4, (AP) — Dr. Amos O. Squire, medical examiner of Westchester county, reported today poison played no part in the death of kidnaped [sic] Peter Levine, 12, whose headless body was recovered from Long Island sound last Sunday.

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946.  I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals.   I am happy to email full-size scans of any article.  Feel free to ask.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Why Spreadsheets are Cuter Than Kittens – Part 3

In this final installment, I want to share two spreadsheets that I wish I could claim credit for imagining.  The first is very basic, but its usefulness is immeasurable.  My friend Laura created this one, and I am discussing it here with her permission.  I give you … Genealogy At A Glance!

genealogy at a glance

The purpose of this spreadsheet is twofold.  First, as its name implies, it allows you to see, at a glance, the information you are missing for your relatives.  I am only using it for my direct ancestors, but you could certainly use it for whomever you choose.  There is no special formatting, so I don’t feel the need to paste a link, but I will explain a couple of the columns.  In the fourth column, labeled “R2M,” is the person’s relationship to you.  I use an M or P to indicate whether it’s a maternal or paternal ancestor, then “3GM” for third great grandmother, etc.  Also, dates are a little funky in Excel – particularly anything prior to 1900.  For that reason, the dates are entered yyyy mm-dd.  Otherwise, you’ll end up with a number that means nothing.  It also makes it easier to sort.

The remaining columns are self-explanatory, but I draw your attention to the last column.  This is where I put the next steps I need to take to find the missing information.

The second spreadsheet was the result of a photo that I posted on Facebook where I had mapped out the entire township where my 2nd great grandfather received his land patent (South Dakota uses the rectangular land survey system).2013-11-13 14.49.05

A couple of people asked me if I had a template for that.  I just printed the plat map from the BLM-GLO website to do this one, but because (1) the plat maps are pretty small for all the detail; and (2) all of the land entries don’t have original plat maps available, I went ahead and created a template:

plat map

Feel free to download it from Google Drive and use it to your heart’s content.  I have indicated portions down to the 1/4 section.  From there, you’ll have to get the smaller parts.

I hope you have enjoyed this little series, and that you see how spreadsheets can be used for more than just accounting.  If you need a form and can’t find one already made, consider using a spreadsheet to create one!

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Things that make you go “hmmm …”

There I was.  Minding my own business, entering some newly-obtained marriage records (thank you, fellow APGer Melissa Johnson) into my source list in RootsMagic.  The first item was a marriage certificate for Lily Frances Gallagher and Michael John Durkin dated December 31, 1905.  They were married at Sacred Heart Church in Camden, New Jersey.  Their parents are listed, the priest is listed, and the witnesses are listed.  Everything is relatively legible.  Nice.

Lillian Gallagher marriageOh look – she was able to get the return too!  Well, the bride’s name is now spelled “Lillie.”  It’s close enough that I can live with it, but otherwise it looks like all the information is the sa– … wait a minute!  The date on the return says they were married on May 9, 1905 by a Justice of the Peace, in front of two witnesses I’ve never heard of.

Lillian Gallagher marriage return

What gives?

So I did what any good genealogist would do … I turned to my genea-friends on Facebook and asked whether this sort of thing was normal.  One of the first questions was whether they were Catholic.  Why, yes they were.

Apparently, that was commonplace during that time (and even more recently) to get married by a Justice of the Peace and then get married – sometimes years later – in the church.

One theory was that there could have been a child born in between the two marriages.  I didn’t find one, but that doesn’t mean there was no pregnancy.  It just puzzles me that if there was no baby on the near horizon, why rush the wedding?  Why not just get married in the church in the first place?

Another theory included an elopement.  Maybe someone didn’t feel as strongly about that marriage as they could have.  Makes sense, I guess.  It would also explain the fact that the witnesses aren’t family members.

Still another theory was that the church didn’t recognize the first one, so they had to do it again.

It also was not uncommon for a couple to have a civil marriage, have a child, then be married by a priest so their child could be raised in the church, or have a Catholic burial, in the case of a stillbirth or an infant death.

While I don’t know the actual reason why there are two marriage records for this couple, at least I have some theories to test, which provide some places to look for answers.

It occurs to me that I probably should read one of these books I have about Catholic records.  I’m pretty sure there is some history in one of them.  I may also ask my cousin, who is basically an expert on all things Catholic (at least compared to me), and see what she knows.

It also occurs to me that maybe I should be looking for additional marriage records for ALL of my relatives.  And now I am completely overwhelmed by the fact that – with the exception of the current generations – I haven’t found anyone in my tree yet that isn’t Catholic.

Feel free to chime in with your own theories in the comments!

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Bathing Pool in Tripp Park Is Now Open

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Yankton Press & Dakotan

4 Jun 1938 (Evening), p. 1, col. 7

Bathing Pool In Tripp Park Is Now Open

Bathing Pool In Tripp ParkThe swimming pool at Tripp park is now open for use by children, it is announced by Theodore Ballensky, park superintendent.

For the present the hours are 9 a. m. to 11 a. m. and from 2 p. m. to 5 p. m.  A life guard will be on duty during these hours.

Later in the year as hot weather advances it is planned to have this pool open for longer hours of the day and also to provide certain hours in the week when the pool will be open to adults, the superintendent states.

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946.  I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals.   I am happy to email full-size scans of any article.  Feel free to ask.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

5 MORE Ways to Build a Better Blog

5 More Ways to Build a Better Blog by Jenny LanctotI previously posted my 7 Ways to Build a Better Blog, and it turns out I’m pretty opinionated … so here are some more!

1.  Don’t Make Your Reader Work So Hard

If your readers have to search high and low through all the clutter on your sidebars for a way to follow or subscribe to your blog, they will simply stop looking.  Clear out the sidebar, leaving only the essentials – a link to your “About” page; your search bar; a follow button or subscribe window; archived posts and/or tags; and THEN all the clutter you want.  If they want to look at it that badly, they will find it.

(The same thing applies to your social media sharing buttons – if I can’t find them I’m not going to use them).

Also – I have noticed recently that there are a lot of blogs out there that simply have no way to subscribe by email.  I’m not sure why that is – but don’t follow in their footsteps.  A lot of readers like that option.  I have pretty close to the same number of email subscribers as those who are using Feedly.

2.  This Should Not Feel Like a Bad Acid Trip

When you choose your theme, ensure that your background image doesn’t conflict with your content.  Busy designs, florals, or anything that moves is just not going to work.  If I get seasick after 10 seconds on your blog, it’s not very likely that I’m going to stick around to hear what you have to say.

The same goes for annoying color schemes.  Using blue text on a black or red background … that’s the stuff of nightmares.  Not sure?  If it resembles an optical illusion, change it.  Still not sure?  Turn off all the lights and try to read it yourself.  If you don’t throw up, it might be okay.

If you just have to use that cute photo or the drawing your 4-year-old did, put your blog posts on a solid-colored opaque (or mostly opaque) background in front of the picture so it doesn’t interfere with the text.

3.  Why Can’t I See This on My Smartphone?

When you are choosing a theme, make sure that it is “responsive.”  This means it is designed to be viewed on a computer screen OR on a mobile device.  There is nothing more frustrating than having some free time while waiting for a bus, a train, a doctor, etc. and not being able to catch up on your blog reading because the blog you want to read requires a magnifying glass or is too gigantic to read more than one word at a time.

4.  A Font is a Font is a Font, Right? Wrong!

This goes back to making things easier for your readers, not harder.  If I want to decipher or translate a blog post, I’ll go read one that’s written entirely in hieroglyphics.  When people read yours, they probably just want to be able to read without any extra work.  Curly-Q and frou-frou fonts are good for party invitations and mother’s day cards, but not on a blog.

Also – once you find a font that works – STICK WITH IT!  Don’t change your font eight times in one blog post.  Don’t worry, you can still bold, underline, italicize to your heart’s content … but if every other sentence looks like a headline or a footnote, your reader is going to be confused.

5.  Anyone Home?

If you are going to be away from your blog for an extended period of time (even if it’s just because you’re bored or whatever) let your readers know!  I just deleted over 100 blogs from Feedly because they hadn’t been touched in over 4 months and there was no “I’ll be back” post to keep me around.

Like I said, I’m pretty opinionated.  I can’t promise there won’t be another post like this in the future.

Do you have anything to add to this list?

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved