Family Relationships

No, it’s not the beginning of a Dr. Phil show …

It’s springtime.  That means we’re heading into Family Reunion season, which means hanging out with a bunch of people to which you have no idea how (or if) you’re related.  This year, you don’t have to show up unarmed!

With this handy-dandy relationship chart courtesy of Crestleaf, you can determine whether weird Uncle Joe is your uncle … or your “uncle.”

Family-Relationship-Chart

You can head over to the Crestleaf blog and get the chart, or you can print it and carry it with you to all those reunions and parties.

Sadly, it only calculates relationships; it can’t explain why you’re the only normal person in your family.

mad hatter

Crestleaf.com (a Top 100 genealogy site by Genealogy in Time Magazine) is a free online family tree builder that has been used by tens of thousands of people to document their family history. I have no affiliation with the company – they just gave me permission to use their infographic.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Content may contain links that point to commercial enterprises via affiliate relationships. Clicking a link may lead to a commercial web site. Any resulting purchases made by a visitor might result in a commission being paid to Jenny Lanctot. No endorsement of the services or products provided by those commercial enterprises is implied or intended.

#TBT Front Cover Picture Made Girl Popular

!Banner 10.18.41

Yankton Press & Dakotan
October 18, 1941 (Evening), p. 1, col. 4

Front Cover Picture Made Girl Popular p1 c4CLARK, S. D., Oct. 18 AP — Lois Madsen was a happy, 19-year-old blonde farmer’s daughter until a magazine (Life) put her on the front cover.

Then she was invited to make two appearances at a Huron theater as the typical South Dakota farm girl, was asked to nearly a dozen community parties, was offered additional theater appearances, and her packages of fan mail included a proposal of marriage from a man in East Gadsden, Ala.

Now the state hairdresser’s convention plans to “glamorize” her with a Hollywood hair stylist, makeup experts and a Sioux Falls department store dishing out the latest winter fashions.

Lois has accepted all the proposals except the one for marriage.

If you’re curious, you can see the October 6, 1941 magazine cover here.  

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Content may contain links that point to commercial enterprises via affiliate relationships. Clicking a link may lead to a commercial web site. Any resulting purchases made by a visitor might result in a commission being paid to Jenny Lanctot. No endorsement of the services or products provided by those commercial enterprises is implied or intended.

Genealogy Do-Over: Week 12 Progress

red-do-over-button

Yep.  Still behind.  I’ve been nursing a sore shoulder this week, and prepping for one trial and mediation in two other cases – all happening in the next month.  I’ve been plugging away at my Do-Over when time permits, which hasn’t been often … but at least it’s still forward progress.  Let’s look at this week’s objectives:

Objective: Share Research

Wikid Shareable TreeFortunately, I don’t need to go an “undo” any old public trees that I have online – because I only have one and it’s on WikiTree.  I’m all about sharing, but I like to be a little more in control of changes people make to my research.  On WikiTree, no one can change a profile I’ve created unless I put them on the “trusted” list; merges have to be approved by the managers of BOTH profiles; I get to manage the privacy settings for each profile; there is a team of people like the WikiChicks who monitor the profiles and try to find matches to prevent duplicates in the tree; and each researcher must swear a blood oath … okay, it’s really just an Honor Code … but still.  It makes me feel much better about what I put out there.  Yes, there is a learning curve to using WikiTree, but it’s not that difficult and once you get it, it’s really pretty easy.  Oh, did I mention it’s FREE?

I’ve only gotten past the living folks, so I will be updating my profiles on WikiTree in conjunction with my Do-Over progress.  I’ll probably just make sure all the information is correct and that I have sources for everything.  Later, when I start researching again, I’ll be adding biographical sketches for each person and pretty-up the profiles a bit.

Objective: Review Research Travel Options

travelI work full-time, so my travel opportunities are limited to 3 weeks per year (I reserve the week of sick days for when I really don’t feel like going to work – *cough cough*).  I try to squeeze in one genealogy conference each year, and this year was no different – except that I never actually went to the conference – I spent all my time in the Family History Library in Salt Lake City.  But I still got to see a lot of my geneafriends and made a few new ones too!

Because I live about 500 miles away from the nearest “genealogy destination” (a place where any of my ancestors lived), a day or weekend trip is usually out of the question – mainly because the places I need to go – courthouses, health departments, etc. – aren’t open on the weekends.  So I have to be creative and try to get as much research done online as I can, then work with my local library and Family History Center to procure microfilm for other research, then whatever is left is what needs to be done in person.  Then I try to incorporate that research into plans for travel to a conference or to visit family (we really shouldn’t forget the living, right?).  And if by some stroke of luck, another family member gets bitten by the genealogy bug, well … win-win.

Budget plays a big part in when, where, and (especially) how I travel.  If it takes less than 8 hours by car to get to my destination, I will drive.  Of course, that’s only if I plan on staying for several days.  Otherwise, not worth the drive.  If I can plan stops along the way to do a tourist-y thing or to see family (like visiting my daughter in Nashville on my way to Evansville, Indiana) then I consider that a bonus.  Plus, if you can STAY with family, your travel budget goes a lot farther!

I have a week in June that I am planning to (1) recover from my trial in May, and (2) drive up to Evansville for a day or two to visit the folks in the best clerk’s office in the world.

Coming up next time: Week 13 – Securing Research Data and Reviewing the Journey

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Content may contain links that point to commercial enterprises via affiliate relationships. Clicking a link may lead to a commercial web site. Any resulting purchases made by a visitor might result in a commission being paid to Jenny Lanctot. No endorsement of the services or products provided by those commercial enterprises is implied or intended.

Scrabble Day: Ancestor Edition

2015-04-11 08.36.54

Today is Scrabble Day.  It is celebrated in honor of the birthday of its inventor, Alfred Mosher Butts.  Alfred was an American architect, born in Poughkeepsie, New York in 1899.  After losing his job, he invented the game in 1938.  It has since gone through several hands and more than 150 million games have been sold worldwide.  You can read more about Alfred and the evolution of Scrabble here.

I want to mention two things about this day:

First, I think it’s a little bit cool that one of my favorite games was invented by a man with the last name Butts.  Not because it’s funny (okay, maybe I chuckled a little), but because I have Butts in my tree; they married into the Diefenbach family.  I can’t stop my do-over right now to find out if we are actually related to Alfred, but believe me – it’s on my to-do list!

Second, there aren’t enough Cs, Ks, or Hs in the actual game.  If there were, I wouldn’t have had to use two blanks to complete my surname puzzle!  (Also – if we could use proper nouns in the game, I would totally win with this board – look at all those Hs, Ks, and Ys!)  Supposedly, Alfred used the front page of the New York Times as a gauge to see how many times letters were used.  He should have read his local Poughkeepsie newspaper … then I would have more Ks and Hs!

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Content may contain links that point to commercial enterprises via affiliate relationships. Clicking a link may lead to a commercial web site. Any resulting purchases made by a visitor might result in a commission being paid to Jenny Lanctot. No endorsement of the services or products provided by those commercial enterprises is implied or intended.

Genealogy Do-Over Cycle 2: Week 1

red-do-over-buttonI know what you’re thinking: I must be a glutton for punishment. Yes, I’m doing the Do-Over again (still, actually).  But this time I’m taking a different approach.  I’m going to follow each week and instead of rehashing everything I did last time, my plan is to make a to-do list with planned “done by” dates for each objective that I haven’t already completed.

My reasons for this are simple: each objective in the Do-Over will take me far longer than a week to accomplish (unless someone wants to fully fund my standard of living, in which case – please contact me privately), and it’s pretty much the only way I can stay organized on this journey of a thousand miles.

This week was easy.  I completed these objectives during the first go-round.  You can read how I prepared for the first Do-Over here and here, and how I began with Week 1 here.

Just remember: it’s not a race; it’s a marathon.  One step at a time.

marathon

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Content may contain links that point to commercial enterprises via affiliate relationships. Clicking a link may lead to a commercial web site. Any resulting purchases made by a visitor might result in a commission being paid to Jenny Lanctot. No endorsement of the services or products provided by those commercial enterprises is implied or intended.