#TBT Hearing at Platte on Missouri Game Refuge

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Yankton Press & Dakotan
4 Jun 1938 (Evening); p. 2, col. 4

Hearing at Platte MO Game RefugeHEARING AT PLATTE ON MISSOURI GAME REFUGE

PLATTE (Special) — A special hearing held here by Mr. O. H. Johnson, state director of Game and Fish, was largely attended by sportsmen from Mitchell, Lake Andes, Scotland, Corsica, Armour and Platte, and by several game wardens and deputies, including D. Allgier of Lake Andes.

The hearing was for the purpose of ascertaining sentiment concerning the closing of the Missouri river in South Dakota from the Rosebud Bridge south of Platte to the Nebraska state line, a distance of 12 1/4 miles, to further shooting of migratory waterfowl in season.  The river has been closed from this bridge northward across the state to the North Dakota state line for a number of years, and the state fish and game department now proposes to close it the rest of the way.  Considerable opposition was shown to the proposition, but the majority seemed to favor it.

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Happy 4th Blogiversary to me!

empty plate

Originally, there was a celebratory cake on this plate.  Oops.  It was delicious.

Four years ago today, I wrote and published my first blog post.  Since then, I have written and published 428 more.  Some have been informative, some have been silly, and some might have even gotten me into a bit of trouble.  And still people read them.  And for that, I thank you, my loyal (or at least tolerant) readers.  I wouldn’t still be here without you.

In the last four years, I have made some great friends in the genealogy and blogging communities – both virtually and in real life – and I have learned something from each and every one of you that has helped shape me into the writer I am today.  So I guess what I’m saying is … you’re to blame.

Seriously though, in writing this blog I have been able to merge two of my great passions – genealogy and writing – and I’m glad to have you all along for the ride.

Here’s to at least 4 more years!

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Gallagher-O’Toole 95th Anniversary

Today is the 95th wedding anniversary of Joseph Meyers Gallagher, the brother of my great grandfather Walter Gallagher, and Agnes M. O’Toole.  Joseph and Agnes were married on October 19, 1919 at 5:30 p.m. at St. Augustine’s Church in Union Hill, New Jersey.  The marriage is purported to be the first for both of them, but I learned long ago not to put much faith in that information (especially where these Gallaghers are concerned).  Joseph was 25 years old and worked as a clerk.  Agnes was 22 years old.

Joseph Gallagher  and Agnes O'Toole marriage

Agnes was born in New York City to parents Hugh O’Toole and Jane Young.  Joseph was born in Camden, New Jersey, in 1894.  The marriage certificate shows that the couple lived at 209 Columbia Street, Union Hill, New Jersey.  In 1926, Union Hill and West Hoboken merged to become Union City, New Jersey, and most of the street names were changed.  Columbia Street became 44th Street.  Best estimate is that this is where they lived (maybe that was their stove!):

209 Columbia (44th)
After they were married, the 1920 census places them at 209 Main Street (which is now 43rd Street in Union City), almost directly behind the address they gave on the marriage certificate.  They were renting one part of this dwelling, most likely with a rear entrance, from  Joseph’s mother Mary Wiltse and her second husband Arthur Cohen.  This one makes me feel a little better:

209 Main St Union Hill (43rd St Union City)
Joseph died on July 4, 1947 and is buried with Agnes at the Long Island National Cemetery in Farmingdale, New York.  She outlived him by 46 years.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

Surname Saturday: Stiker

Stiker

Surname Origins

According to the Internet Surname Database, the Stiker surname has not been researched.  Bummer.  A general Google search for “Stiker surname origins” yielded no legitimate results either.  My money is on German origins, but I could be wrong.  Perhaps from the German/French border area?

Surname in my Tree

My closest Crowe ancestor is my great grandmother, Lucile Francis Stiker (1900-1969).  Her father was Eugene Francis Stiker (1869-1935) and his father was Gustave Justin Stiker (abt 1840-1923).

Migration

According to census records, Gustave Justin Stiker was born in France, as were his (as yet unknown) parents.  He supposedly immigrated to the United States in either 1838 or 1840, depending on which census record you believe.  Immigration and/or naturalization records have not yet been located, but it’s on my list.  Justin married Louisa Canet (abt. 1840-abt. 1880) sometime prior to 1862, and I’m not sure whether they were married before or after immigrating to the U.S.  A marriage record has also not been located.  The couple settled in Evansville and remained for the rest of their lives.  They had 5 children: Lucy, Lushes (Lucius?), Eugene Francis, Lillian, Frank, and John J.  Louisa died between 1880 and 1885, and Justin married Emily Long in 1885.  Justin died on October 4, 1912, as evidenced by his death notice and funeral notice.

Future Research

I’ve been a little lax on my research on this family.  I need to revisit the information I have, particularly for Justin, and create a research plan.  Obviously, a marriage record for Justin and Louisa needs to be located, as well as immigration/naturalization records, if any exist, and pretty much everything for Louisa needs to be found.

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved

#TBT Seen and Heard Around Town

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Yankton Press & Dakotan
4 Jun 1938 (Evening); p. 1, col. 6

Seen and Heard Around TownSEEN and HEARD AROUND TOWN —

   Fishermen telling about the four-inch bullheads they have been getting . . . And that is about all . . . . It is said that the alibis of the traffic violators picked up are novel in the extreme . . . There will be no school election to worry about . . . Benny Crowther polishing the new motorcycle . . . Many remarking that the old raincoat is usually at the wrong end of the line . . . The straw-hat tempters not meeting with much success so far . . . Walter Mueller walking up the street without a hat as usual . . . Some suspicious about “Boots” Freidel’s and Al Goddard’s three consecutive black jacks . . . Rudy Fribourghouse talking about getting a fishing license . . . And school events just about all wound up for this school year.

 

I purchased roughly 25 original issues of the Yankton (South Dakota) Press & Dakotan, dating from 1938 to 1946. I am systematically going through every issue and will be posting the articles that include the names of individuals. I am happy to email full-size scans of any article. Feel free to ask.

 

 

Do we share any ancestors?
Please email me at lostancestors [at] gmail [dot] com

Copyright 2014 - Are My Roots Showing? All rights reserved